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Centipedes
Millipedes
Cockroaches

Lice
Kissing bugs
Bed bugs
Beetles
Fleas
Flies
Mosquitoes
Black flies
Deer flies
Horse flies

Filth flies
Tsetse flies
Blow flies

Flesh flies
Biting Midges
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Ants, Wasps, and Bees
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Mites and Ticks
Soft ticks
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Hair follicle mite
Scabies mites
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Other Mites

Class Insecta
Order Diptera

Flies

 

Flies, gnats, maggots, midges, mosquitoes, keds, bots, etc. are all common names for members of the order Diptera. This diversity of names documents the importance of the group to man and reflects the range of organisms in the order. The order is one of the four largest groups of living organisms. There are more known flies than vertebrates. These insects are a major component of virtually all non-marine ecosystems. Only the cold Arctic and Antarctic ice caps are without Flies. The economic importance of the group is immense. One need only consider the ability of flies to transmit diseases. Mosquitoes and black flies are responsible for more human suffering and death than any other group of organisms except for the transmitted pathogens and man! Flies also destroy our food, especially grains and fruits. On the positive side of the ledger, outside their obviously essential roles in maintaining our ecosystem, flies are of little direct benefit to man. Some are important as experimental animals (Drosophila) and biological control agents of weeds and other insects.


The above was taken from....

 

The Diptera Site